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 SUCH STUFF AS DREAMS GALLERY VIEW 2LongitudeThe Beauty of our World is being broken  

Large Scale Folio Works                                                          https://www.facebook.com/pages/Neil-Pittaway/339997539519402      https://twitter.com/NeilJPittaway   

 

'Longitude' Original 9 plate etching printed from copper plates based   

The ideas and context behind Neil’s Longitude etching

The starting point for this work stemmed from Neil's interest in the visual world; it’s history and development  through creative and inventive processes, and how these have in turn shaped the modern planet we live in. Neil was and is fascinated by the history of Longitude and how it was solved by the Yorkshire 18th Century clock maker and inventor John Harrison (1693 -1776); this became the focal point for his etching 'Longitude'.

  

        

 Longitude, 189 x 256 cm, Etching and Drypoint (Edition of 20)

     

  Key to Longitude Etching 

 15 Image of Greenwich, London in the  time of Charles II

 

Admiral Nelson’s Funeral procession on the River Thames

 16 John Harrison's H4 Time Piece which won the Longitude prize

 

2 South American Globe Symbolising the stable world

 

 17 John Harrison’s Prototype for solving  the Longitude problem 

3 Admiral Nelson being brought back on the damage HMS Victory from the Battle of Trafalgar at Gibraltar

 

19 HMS Bounty, Captain Cook’s Ship 

4 Shipwreck caricatures from the James Gillray shipwreck scenes

 

20 The 5 Continents of the world –  symbolising that Longitude was used to  map the worlds ocean 

5 Ship mast structure and 18th century lamp

 21 Satellite image of central Paris.  (These satellite images symbolise the  modern ideas of exploration now).

 

6. The Manhattan skyline, New York City

 22  Mechanical automata guiding ships  safely, this represents what happened  after the Longitude problem was  solved  by John Harrison

 

7. JMW Turner Steam ship painting symbolising the modern world and industrial power in the 19th Century 

23 The Louvre museum, Paris 

8. 18th century clipper ship – ship of discovery

 

24 Satellite image of central London.  (These satellite images symbolise the  modern ideas of exploration now)

 

 

9 Statue of Liberty – in a beacon of light chandelier

 25 Big Ben (Elizabeth Tower)  representing world time

 

10 The Brooklyn Bridge, New York City

 26 Shipwreck caricatures from the  James Gillray shipwreck scenes

11 H4 – John Harrison’s chronometer that solved and won the prize for Longitude 

 

27 Royal Hospital Greenwich by Sir  Christopher Wren 

12 Industrial revolution – coal train and Lions representing strength and imperial power

 

28 Admiral Nelson’s Battle Victories 

13 Sir Walter Raleigh

 

29 Satellite image of the Millennium  Dome and the East end of London

 

 

14 Portrait of Admiral Lord Nelson

30 Captain Scott’s expedition to the  Antarctic  

 

 

 

 The Beauty of our World is being Broken, Large Scale Pen and ink drawing   

This large ambitious work take's it's inspiration from climate change and the impact that human kind as 

had on our planet, reflecting what geoligists and Academics  call our current age, the 'age of Anthroposcene'.

 

This drawing is a mixture of complex images and messages and is aimed to show the imapact that us humans

have had on the natural world and it's reources, this can be seen throughout the compositon from closed 

off Himalayas to visitors because of damage caused by climate change to Animals being driven to almost 

exstinction and the melting ice caps. To over production and mass globalisation of  consumer apetite

at the expence of the Natural environment and it's resources. 

 

Clocks are featured prominanently in this work, at the drawings centre sits a medeival like doomsday clock

an ominous reminder that time is running out for the World. 

 

This complex drawing was executed by building up sequences of images based on engineering, science 

and exploration using traditional dip pen and ink on 6 sheets of handmade Amalfi paper conservationally 

joined together to form the overall picture.

    

  

        

  

     

          

 

 

Such Stuff of Dreams, Large Scale drawing, 222 x 153cm

This large ambitious work take's it's inspiration from many historical sources, these include the great 

engineering projects of the 19th and early 20th centuries from the Eiffel tower to the fourth bridge.

These are interwined in a labyrinth of other historical debris from the Renaisance and Enlightment 

periods and include the Tower of Pisa, Galileo's first studies of the moonand his telescope, to other 

voyages of discovery and beyond from Antarctica to outer space.

 

This complex drawing was executed by building up sequences of images based on engineering, science 

and exploration using traditional dip pen and ink on 9 sheets of handmade Amalfi paper conservationally 

joined together to form the overall picture.

     

       

 

'The London Connection ' Original 3 plate etchin g printed from copper plate based on London 

 

 The London Connection, 77 x 256 cm, Etching (Ed.A of 30)

This London Connection etching portrays the development of the modern metropolis. Split into three sections, the 

left-handpanel represents the early 20th century, travel and links to North America. The middle section concentrates on the

lifeblood, the heartbeat of the metropolis based on Britain's imperial past. Everything in this section is for display - a false

paradise where the past is brought to life as a theme park. The right-hand panel represents the modern vision of the

metropolis and Britain's wider role in the contemporary world, now symbolised by it's links to Europe.

 

 

The London Connection, Etching (An edition of which is  held in the Guildhall Art Library, Collection in London  

Images below show details of each section part of Neil's London Connection Etching 

 

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 
 

    

 

 
 

    

 

 
 

    

 

 
 

     

 

 
 

     

 

 
 

     

 

 
 

      

 

 
 

      

 

 
 

       

 

 
 

       

 

 
 

       

 

 
 

        

 

 
 

        

 

 
           

 

©Neil John Pittaway